Good Friday: We Are On Trial

John’s Gospel is so different from all the others, because Jesus the spotlight is on his eternal divinity in all its power.

 

One dominant theme throughout the Passion according to John is that when Jesus is brought up on charges before the High Priest, before Pilate, and even before the crowds, it turns out that not […]

Maundy Thursday: Don’t Keep Safe. Keep Loving!

These epidemic days everyone tells us, “Keep safe.” But our real job is to keep loving, and loving often isn’t safe.

 

Maundy Thursday gets its name from the Latin, mandatum, which means “commandment.” Jesus’ new commandment to us, which encompasses and expands all valid laws known to humankind, is “Love as I loved you.”

 

The Fourth Gospel […]

At the Tomb of Lazarus

John 11:1-45

Gospel for the Fifth Sunday in Lent, Year A

Several times a day my wife and I scan the New York Times on line. These days, of course, we find that almost every article is more bad news about the current pandemic—each story worse than the last. Perhaps the most disturbing article of all was the one today […]

The Samaritan Woman: Life That Gushes

We are still playing catch-up on the great dialogs of the Fourth Gospel appointed for Lent. Last Sunday was the Third Sunday of Lent, and the appointed Gospel reading was from John, chapter four, which features Jesus’ dialog with the Samaritan woman at Jacob’s well.

 

I subtitle this the “Life that Gushes.” Jesus asks a woman […]

The Woman at the Well

The famous dialog between Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well is part of a series of beautifully crafted dialogs in the Fourth Gospel. Several themes appear repeatedly in this series.

 

Spiritual knowing or seeing is one theme. Jesus is operating on the highest spiritual plane and he works to lift others up—something that […]

Knowing and Not Knowing: The Holy Trinity

Tomorrow is Holy Trinity Sunday.

I believe the best thing about the doctrine of the Trinity is its nod to unknowing. The early church beat back several attempts to make the knowledge of God manageable. Gnostics wanted to  have a spiritual god who was above the blood and sweat and nagging ambiguities of the material world. […]